How Bosa Caught the Millennials’ Attention

with a fashion-inspired website

How do you turn an identity-lacking area into the coolest neighborhood downtown? Asking Brand Director Jason Wong behind Parkway, selling homes like T-shirts is not the answer. But it might be a great way to start.

Architectural visualization of Parkway for Bosa, a semi-areal view of a civic area in the evening light.
The condo development Parkway in Surrey, Canada is developed by BlueSky Properties, a division of Bosa Family Companies, and scheduled for completion in 2026.

It sounds like they had a bit of a shaky start, the marketing team back in Vancouver. Maneuvering new policies in Surrey where Parkway is to be built, and sudden shiftings in demographics. Then there were the sketchy surroundings and on top of that: a pandemic.

“The idea was to take some of the best-in-class consumer digital experiences in the world and bring them to real estate.”

— Jason Wong

Yet, after years of preparations, when the Parkway website finally went live — the 362 homes of the first tower sold out in less than a week. An outcome that Brand Director Jason Wong in charge of leading out the brand and marketing strategy at BlueSky Properties, could only wish for.

“Our goal was to make it the North Star of the entire downtown area. You know, in up-and-coming places, there’s usually a particular building or development that everyone associates it with. That’s what we were aiming for with Parkway. But of course, you never know how these things will turn out, so it came as a pleasant surprise.”

”Millennials grew up looking for strong, lifestyle-oriented brands, so why not make homes as easy as other products to engage in?”

— Jason Wong

So what was the masterplan behind it? Well, to make their Parkway dream come to life in the busy minds of young millennials, the marketing team knew they had to bring more to the table than a traditional website and some nice images to go with it.

To show every side and angle of Parkway life, more than 50 visualizations and numerous virtual tours were integrated to the website.

Un unusual website — because why not?

Unlike the usual clean and tidy project websites, Parkway was given a highly interactive setup, with animations reacting to your behavior, personal pathways to follow and a large amount of dynamic lifestyle images and films.

“The idea was to take some of the best-in-class consumer digital experiences in the world and bring them to real estate. Simply because: why not? Millennials grew up looking for strong, lifestyle-oriented brands, so why not make homes as easy as other products to engage in?”

The lifestyle content was then playfully mixed with architectural visualizations of the Parkway amenities, including the 16,000 square-foot pavilions with a fully equipped gym, plunge pool, yoga studio, sports court, workshop and several co-working spaces.

“If the sales team call like 6000 people when 4000 have no intention of buying, it’s obviously a huge waste of time. It’s also frustrating for you if you are seriously interested and we didn’t recognize it. So the wall was a way for us to know who really wanted that call.”

— Jason Wong

To enhance the immersive experience even more, several virtual tours were integrated into the website. But, again, in a way rarely seen in new builds. If you wanted to get access the virtual tours, and have a 360° view of the apartments, you namely had to fill in a contact form, ready to be sent straight to the BlueSky sales team.

The website was loaded with dynamic lifestyle content, inspired by big consumer brands in fashion and retail.
The dynamic site setup and lifestyle content was inspired by the websites of successful consumer brands in fashion and retail.

Hiding virtual tours to collect leads

One of the marketing goals in Parkway was: no lost leads. And to help qualify visitors and hand potential customers over to the sales team, BlueSky put a lot of effort into integrating Marketing Qualified Leads (MQL) to the website.

Among other things, this meant you had to fill in a contact form to access the immersive virtual tours of the homes available for purchase. 

”A home is not something you can buy and then change the next day, so we have to create places where people actually want to live.”

— Jason Wong

“If the sales team call like 6000 people when 4000 have no intention of buying, it’s obviously a huge waste of time. It’s also frustrating for you if you are seriously interested and we didn’t recognize it. So the wall was a way for us to know who really wanted that call and who didn’t.”

To integrate this wall on the website was not an obvious call since it might annoy potential buyers. However, the first evaluation proved the move successful in separating the hot prospects from the rest.

Click here to get the full screen experience

Building on learnings from backpacks

So in the world of new-builds as we know it, Parkway stands out. But then, as it turns out, Jason is not the average real estate marketing kind of guy either. Nor is his progressive marketing team at BlueSky Properties.

“You know I actually used to brand backpacks before BlueSky. And fashion marketing is something I’m really passionate about. The leader of our department here also came from fashion. And my boss, she worked at the game developer EA. So it do help us see things a little differently.”

To Jason, this experience from the outside world, is one of his team’s greatest assets. And potentially, one of the golden keys to Parkway’s initial success. But as he points out: Even if marketers in new builds have much to learn from successful consumer brands in fashion and retail, homes are, and will never be, T-shirts.

”A home is not something you can buy and then change the next day. So we have to create places where people actually want to live. Not only today, but years from now. And there’s always a risk when you’re trying to sell something five years out of completion. So I guess time will tell how well we really did with Parkway.”

Good ideas deserve outstanding visualizations